FedEx Grapples With TNT Express Cyberattack: Time to Dump?

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“FedEx’s operations have been severely hurt by the Jun 27 cyberattack on its subsidiary, TNT Express. The attack caused large-scale service delays on its TNT Express unit. Evidently, the company’s top line in first-quarter fiscal 2018 was affected, primarily due to decreased volumes at TNT Express. First-quarter results were also hampered by Hurricane Harvey. In fact, the company incurred costs of approximately $300 million during the quarter due to the catastrophe.”

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Author: Zacks Equity Research

U.S. moves to ban Kaspersky software in federal agencies amid concerns of Russian espionage.

The U.S. government on Wednesday moved to ban the use of a Russian brand of security software by federal agencies amid concerns the company has ties to state-sponsored cyberespionage activities.

In a binding directive, acting homeland security secretary Elaine Duke ordered that federal civilian agencies identify Kaspersky Lab software on their networks. After 90 days, unless otherwise directed, they must remove the software, on the grounds that the company has connections to the Russian government and its software poses a security risk.

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Author: Ellen Nakashima and Jack Gillum

Equifax Faces Multibillion-Dollar Lawsuit Over Hack

A proposed class-action lawsuit was filed against Equifax Inc. late Thursday evening, shortly after the company reported that an unprecedented hack had compromised the private information of about 143 million people.

In the complaint filed in Portland, Ore., federal court, users alleged Equifax was negligent in failing to protect consumer data, choosing to save money instead of spending on technical safeguards that could have stopped the attack. Data revealed included Social Security numbers, addresses, driver’s license data, and birth dates. Some credit card information was also put at risk.

Equifax first discovered the vulnerability in late July, though it chose not to announce it publicly until more than a month later. The company was widely criticized for its customer service approach in the aftermath of the hack, as users struggled to understand whether their information had been affected. Others expressed frustration that three senior executives sold about $1.7 million in stock in the days following the discovery of the hack. A spokeswoman for Equifax said the men “had no knowledge that an intrusion had occurred at the time.”

The plaintiffs in the lawsuit are Mary McHill and Brook Reinhard. Both reside in Oregon and had their personal information stored by Equifax.

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Author: Polly Mosendz
Image: CBS

See if you were someone impacted by the breach.

HBO’s Twitter accounts hacked in latest cyberattack

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“Premium cable channel HBO has fallen victim yet again to a hacker attack. This time its official Twitter account was broken into, along with accounts for several of its most popular shows.

A group calling itself OurMine gained control of HBO’s main account Wednesday night, according to the Hollywood Reporter. It left a message in a tweet saying, “Hi, OurMine are here, we are just testing your security, HBO team please contact us to upgrade the security – ourmine .org -> Contact.”

A second tweet read, “let’s make #HBOHacked trending!”

The group also posted messages on the accounts for the shows “Vinyl,” “true Blood,” “Silicon Valley,” “Looking,” “Last Week Tonight,” “Veep” and “The Leftovers.”

A spokesperson for the channel told the Hollywood Reporter, “We are investigating.”

HBO was initially hacked several weeks ago, resulting in scripts, unaired episodes and other digital files from the channel’s servers being released onto the internet.”

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Author: Hollywood Reporter

Hackers Have Been Targeting US Nuclear And Power Plants, And Russia Is Reportedly Suspected

“Hackers believed to be working for a foreign government have recently penetrated the computer networks of power plants across the US, including a nuclear facility in Kansas, according to reports published Thursday.

Security specialists have been responding to attacks at various nuclear power and energy facilities since May, according to an urgent joint report issued June 28 by the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI and obtained by the New York Times.

In a statement to BuzzFeed News, the two agencies said they “are aware of a potential cyber intrusion affecting entities in the energy sector, but there is no indication of a threat to public safety, as any potential impact appears to be limited to administrative and business networks.”

At least a dozen power plants were affected by the attacks, including the Wolf Creek nuclear facility in Kansas, the reports said. The hackers behind the effort are believed to be working for a foreign government, the chief suspect being Russia, sources told Bloomberg.

A DHS spokesperson would not comment on where the attacks came from and how any facilities were compromised.

Wolf Creek said that while it cannot publicly comment on security issues, its operational controls had not been affected and that the plant is operating safely.”

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Author: Brianna Sacks

The Petya ransomware is starting to look like a cyberattack in disguise

“The haze of yesterday’s massive ransomware attack is clearing, and Ukraine has already emerged as the epicenter of the damage. Kaspersky Labs reports that as many as 60 percent of the systems infected by the Petya ransomware were located within Ukraine, far more than anywhere else. The hack’s reach touched some of the country’s most crucial infrastructure including its central bank, airport, metro transport, and even the Chernobyl power plant, which was forced to move radiation-sensing systems to manual.

The ostensible purpose of all that damage was to make money — and yet there’s very little money to be found. Most ransomware flies under the radar, quietly collecting payouts from companies eager to get their data back and decrypting systems as payments come in. But Petya seems to have been incapable of decrypting infected machines, and its payout method was bizarrely complex, hinging on a single email address that was shut down almost as soon as the malware made headlines. As of this morning, the Bitcoin wallet associated with the attack had received just $10,000, a relatively meager payout by ransomware standards.

It leads to an uncomfortable question: what if money wasn’t the point? What if the attackers just wanted to cause damage to Ukraine? It’s not the first time the country has come under cyberattack. (These attacks have typically been attributed to Russia.) But it would be the first time such an attack has come in the guise of ransomware, and has spilled over so heavily onto other countries and corporations.

Because the virus has proven unusually destructive in Ukraine, a number of researchers have come to suspect more sinister motives at work. Peeling apart the program’s decryption failure in a post today, Comae’s Matthieu Suiche concluded a nation state attack was the only plausible explanation. “Pretending to be a ransomware while being in fact a nation state attack,” Suiche wrote, “ is in our opinion a very subtle way from the attacker to control the narrative of the attack.””

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Author: Russel Brandom

Plaintiffs’ Counsel Announce $115 Million Proposed Class Action Settlement in Anthem Data Breach Litigation

A proposed settlement has been reached in a class action lawsuit over the 2015 cyberattack of health insurer Anthem, Inc., involving the theft of the personal information of 78.8 million people. The $115 million settlement, if approved by the Court, will be the largest data breach settlement in history. Attorneys from Altshuler Berzon, Cohen Milstein, Girard Gibbs and Lieff Cabraser were court-appointed to lead the representation of the plaintiffs in the litigation.

The proposed settlement provides for Anthem to establish a $115 million settlement fund, which will be used to

    1) provide victims of the data breach at least two years of credit monitoring
    2) cover out-of-pocket expenses incurred by consumers as a result of the data breach
    3) provide cash compensation for those consumers who are already enrolled in credit monitoring.

In addition to the monetary fund, the settlement will require Anthem to guarantee a certain level of funding for information security and to implement or maintain numerous specific changes to its data security systems, including encryption of certain information and archiving sensitive data with strict access controls. The settlement is designed to protect class members from future risk, provide compensation, and ensure best cybersecurity practices to deter against future data breaches.

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Microsoft warns ransomware cyber-attack is a wake-up call

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“A cyber-attack that has hit 150 countries since Friday should be treated by governments around the world as a “wake-up call”, Microsoft says.

It blamed governments for storing data on software vulnerabilities which could then be accessed by hackers.

It says the latest virus exploits a flaw in Microsoft Windows identified by, and stolen from, US intelligence.”

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Author: BBC News

Log in, look out: Cyberattack havoc may grow at week’s start

“An unprecedented ‘‘ransomware’’ cyberattack that has already hit tens of thousands of victims in 150 countries could wreak greater havoc as more malicious variations appear and people return to their desks Monday and power up computers at the start of the workweek.

As a loose global network of cybersecurity experts fought a rearguard battle against ransomware hackers, officials and experts on Sunday urged organizations and companies to update operating systems immediately to ensure they aren’t vulnerable to a second, more powerful version of the software — or to future versions that can’t be stopped.

The initial ransomware attack, known as ‘‘WannaCry,’’ paralyzed computers that run Britain’s hospital network, Germany’s national railway and scores of other companies and government agencies worldwide in what was believed to be the biggest online extortion scheme ever recorded.”

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Author: Sylvia Hui and Christopher S. Rugaber, Associated Press

Global Cyberattack Reaches ‘Unprecedented’ Scale

More than 150 countries have been hit by the coordinated hack, with some of the world’s largest institutions still struggling to recover.

Friday’s global cyberattack on businesses, universities, and health systems has reached new size, with large institutions and security experts hurrying to address a breach that has now affected more than 150 countries. The cyberattack was first identified in the United Kingdom, whose National Health Service (NHS) suffered one of the day’s largest and most severe hacks. In total, 48 NHS organizations were hit, rendering x-rays, test results, and patient records unavailable and forcing the NHS to suspend its operations.

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Author: Aria Bendix